Introduction to the Pupil Premium

The Pupil Premium (PP) is additional funding given to schools so that they can support particular groups of pupils who are known to be at risk of underachievement. The Pupil Premium is allocated to schools for pupils who are known to be eligible for free school meals or who have been eligible for free school meals in the past six years.

For 2016-17 financial year, we have been given an allocation of £82,640 plus £1,416 remaining from last year giving a total allocation of £84,056. The per pupil allocation for secondary schools is £935 per FSM and ‘Ever6’ pupils. For ‘Looked after Children’ and eligible adopted children, the allocation is £1,900 per pupil. The ‘service child premium’ is set at £300 per pupil. In this year’s allocation we do not have any ‘service’ pupils.

Our aim is to ensure strategic use of the Year 7 Catch-Up Premium results in improvements in reading and mathematics for students who are significantly behind (a score of less than 90 at Key Stage 2).

Pupil Premium review of 2016-17 and Plan for 2017-18 Spend

The Catch Up Premium in 2016-17

The allocation in 2016-17 was £9,063.

How the Premium was used

Year 7 Catch-Up Spend

Cost

% of the Second in English’s salary for identification, liaison with teachers and the LRC manager

£2,076

% of the LRC manager’s time dedicated to improving reading with targeted students

£2,025

% of Head of Maths and maths HLTA time

£4,899

Tracking progress of students with low Key Stage 2 scores

Students who have the lowest Key Stage 2 scores often have FFT20 targets of 2 and 3 for core subjects at the end of Year 11. These students will start school below the GCSE range and therefore progress using the college’s Single Assessment Framework (1-9) is difficult to measure. In addition, we may not expect a student to make a whole sublevel (1- to 1 for example) across Year 7. The mathematics and English faculties, as a response to this, are developing ways to assess the progress of the lowest prior attaining students in Key Stage 3. English will be using Accelerated Reader to track the improvement in students’ reading age. In maths, a maths age will be generated and tracked across the year using Complete Maths. It is expected that these students will be working towards GCSE grade 1 in Year 7. See table below.

End of Year 11 target

2

3

4

Starting Point

0

1

2-

End of Year 7

1-

2-

2+

End of Year 8

1

2

3-

End of Year 9

1+

2+

3+

End of Year 10

2-

3-

4-

End of Year 11

2

3

4

Impact in English

The English Faculty hold detailed records of intervention and impact. Some of the evidence is qualitative. An example is “Meeting with the LRC manager have revealed a strong level of progress with increased independence of reading and commitment to further improvement.” Reading Age testing using Accelerated Reader suggest 78% students have made at least a year’s improvement in reading age across the nine months of the programme. 

Impact in mathematics

Evidence for pupil progress is held in students work books. The mathematics HLTA runs regular sessions with low attaining students and keeps a record of progress using assessment books.

Priorities for 2017-18

  1. Continue the excellent work started in English, and use this to:
  2. Improve the tracking of progress in mathematics
  3. Improve the programme of support in mathematics

2017-18 Spend

The catch-up funding remains at 2015-16 levels, due to the change in Key Stage 2 scoring system. Our allocation, adjusted for pupil numbers, is c.£9,000. The resource will be allocated in a similar way to last year. However, mathematics and English will work more closely to share best practice, with English leading mathematics in improving tracking, monitoring and intervention strategies.

 

Year 7 Catch-Up Spend

Cost

% of the Second in English’s salary for identification, liaison with teachers and the LRC manager

£2,076

% of the LRC manager’s time dedicated to improving reading with targeted students

£2,025

% of Head of Maths and maths HLTA time

£4,899